Assessment for Awareness, Mystery and Value 2016 Key Stage 2

Assessment for Awareness, Mystery and Value 2016 Key Stage 2

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Assessment for Awareness, Mystery and Value 2016

The agreed Religious Education Syllabus for Somerset

This document is statutory

Copyright: Somerset County Council (except Hinduism shared copyright Sushma Sahajpal and Somerset County Council).

Coverage of religions required at foundation and KS2 is Christianity plus three other religions from: Hinduism, Islam or Judaism. Non-religious views (Humanism) must also be represented.The Christianity assessment has been amended to support the Understanding Christianity outcomes.  By the end of KS2 , all pupils must be secure in their knowledge and understanding of the following.

Christianity

All pupils must be secure in their knowledge and understanding of the following. The Somerset SACRE “Christianity – Teacher’s guide” is recommended as helpful in further supporting teachers’ understanding of the material about Christianity in this document.

Schools using Understanding Christianity will be able to cover the AMV 2016 assessment goals of God, Incarnation and Salvation under the Understanding Christianity core concepts of the same name. The relevant AMV 2016 assessment goals for Agape are covered in the Understanding Christianity core concept of Gospel, shown like this. (*Gospel)

 

By the end of lower Key Stage 2

Christianity

Key belief – Salvation

  • Recognise that Christians refer to Jesus as ‘the Saviour’ or as ‘my Saviour’.
  • Explain the Christian Salvation story and that it makes four main claims:
    – God created a perfect the world
    – Humanity went wrong
    – To save humanity, God had a salvation plan
    – God enters into the world as Jesus Christ who saves humanity
  • Recall the key features of the story of Zacchaeus:
    – Understand the context of the story; Zacchaeus is an outcast because he is seen as a greedy, corrupt traitor. Now he is sorry. He wants to make up for his bad deeds and live a better life. (AMV units 2,3,3)
    – Understand the message of the story – that Christians believe Jesus came to forgive and rescue everyone. No one is too bad – or too good.
  • Recall the story of Jesus’ death on the cross. Understand that Christians believe that because Jesus died they can be forgiven by God. (AMV units 2,3,4,5,6,7,8)

Belief – God 

  • Christians will describe one God as Father (parent), Son and Holy Spirit. The Trinity. (AMV units 1,4,5,7,9)
  • Recall what happens in both Infant Baptism and Believers’ Baptism. Water is used. The person baptising usually says “I baptise you in the name of the Father, and the son, and the Holy spirit.” The person is welcomed into the Christian Church. (AMV units 4,5,9)
  • Raise and suggest answers to relevant questions in response to their enquiry into what Christians believe about God.

Belief – Incarnation

  • Recall stories from the Bible of Jesus miracles – what do they say about Jesus? e.g. that Jesus calmed a storm – he had power over the forces of nature Mark 4.35-41, healing Jairus’ daughter – that he had power over death (Luke 8. 40-56). (AMV units 2,3,7,8)
  • Understand what Christians believe these stories say about who Jesus is – that only God can do things like this. Christians believe that Jesus is the Son of God.
  • Raise and suggest answers to relevant questions in response to their enquiry into the accounts of these miracles and what Christians say about who Jesus is.

Belief – Agape (selfless, sacrificial, unconditional love) (*Gospel)

  • Christians try to be like Jesus and obey his teachings in the things that they think and do.
  • Recall the story of the Good Samaritan Luke 10.25-37. Man attacked on dangerous road; left without anything – even clothes; he is seen by a Priest and Levite (respected members of community); Samaritan stops and helps Jew; uses expensive oils; places man on donkey while he walks; taken to inn and pays for stay.
  • Know the context for the story: how the story came to be told – Jesus is asked how to inherit eternal life? Love God and your neighbour as yourself; Jesus is asked who is my neighbour?
  • Understand background to the story; Samaritans and Jews are enemies (at the end of the story the person asking the question cannot even say the word ‘Samaritan’, the people who walked by had good reason (muggers still around; might be a trap; he might be dead anyway (cleansing process); road called ‘red road’ for good reason.
  • How does the story display disinterested love (agape) being shown to all: freely given; generous; selfless; self-sacrificing?
  • Support their attempt to answer the relevant questions they raise in response to their enquiry into the Good Samaritan parable using reasons and information to support their views. (AMV units 2,3,4,6)

Judaism

Key belief: G-d and the Covenant

  • G-d first made his covenant agreement with Abraham. G-d promises he would be the father of a great nation, the Jewish people, who will live in the land of Canaan.
  • Recall the story of the giving of the 10 commandments to Moses: The people of Israel are enslaved in Egypt; G-d sends 10 plagues; the Pharaoh releases the Jews; this hasty departure is known as the exodus; the Jews spent 40 years as nomads; Moses went up Mt Sinai to receive from G-d the 10 commandments and other commandments which were the rules Jews had to live by.
  • Understand that the Jews made an agreement or covenant with G-d: If Jews agree to obey His commandments; the Jews would be His Chosen people.
  • Know that Jews celebrate the exodus at the week-long Passover festival; at the Seder meal Jews re-tell the story of the Exodus using symbolic food. The festival recalls this as a key event in their history because it shows: (a) G-d was at work in the events of history (b) they have been chosen to have a special relationship with G-d.
  • Understand that Jews believe there is one G-d who should be placed above all else.
  • The Shema, which expresses these key beliefs, is placed on the doorpost of Jewish houses in a Mezezah.
  • Raise and suggest answers to relevant questions in response to the story of Moses and the giving of the 10 commandments.
  • Attempt to support their answers using reasons and/or information.

Belief: Torah

  • On the Shabbat Jews attend the synagogue, where they worship G-d. Doing this develops a sense of community.
  • The reading of the Torah is central to the service: during the service there will be readings from the Torah.
  • In the synagogue the Torah (Sefer Torah) is written on parchment, which are written by hand with a special ink. The importance of the scrolls is shown by the way they are:
    • Never touched by human hands- a special pointer is used
    • Each scroll has a mantle (cover)
    • Once they have been used they are returned to the Ark
    • There is an ever-burning lamp outside the Ark to show G-d is always present
  • Know that some Jews wear Tephilin (or Tefillin), which are two straps with boxes on and contain small pieces of parchment from Torah, on the forehead to remind Jews they must love G-d with their mind and on their arm facing the heart to remind Jews they must love G-d with all their heart.
  • Know the Torah is written in Hebrew.
  • Raise and suggest answers to relevant questions in response to the importance and respect Jews give to the Torah.
  • Attempt to support their answers using reasons and/or information.

Islam

Key belief – Islam (Submission to the will of Allah)

  • Know that Islam means “Submission (to the will of Allah)” and the word Muslims means someone who has willingly submitted themselves to Allah.
  • Understand that praying 5 times a day, which is prescribed in the Qur’an, is one way Muslims submit to the will of Allah. They do this by:
    • Being constantly reminded of Allah throughout the day, reminds them for what is important in their life and helps them straying from the path
    • The sujud position (prostration) reflects Muslim submission as a physical act.
    • Salah can take place anywhere, as God created everything
  • Raise and suggest answers to relevant questions in response to what they have learnt about the Islamic belief in submitting to the will of Allah and the practice of Salah.
  • Attempt to support their answers using reasons and/or information

Belief – Iman (faith) Messengers of Allah

  • Know that Muslims believe that Muhammad had many revelations over 22 years.
  • Understand that Islam teaches that Muhammad told many others what the revelations were. They wrote down the Words that had been revealed to Muhammad. What they wrote formed a book – the holy Qur’an.
  • Know that Muslims believe that the angel Gabriel was ‘sent down’ with God’s holy book – the Mother of the Book. This was the book that was shown to Muhammad. So the Qur’an is a copy of God’s holy book.
  • Understand that the Qur’an is treated with great respect by Muslims, including that it is often kept in a stand, kept above all other books, is sometimes wrapped in a cloth, a Muslim will wash their hands before touching the book.
  • Know that God’s message is known as the ‘Straight Path’ or the Shariah
  • Raise and suggest answers to relevant questions in response to what they have learnt about the Islamic belief in submitting to the will of Allah.
  • Attempt to support their answers using reasons and/or information  

Hinduism

Key Belief – Dharma. (Right-living, respecting life, honouring Natural world)

  • Recall stories of the exile, return and reign of Rama from the Hindu book: The Ramayana and understand how they teach a) respect for Parents, b) keeping promises, c) doing the right thing even when it’s hard, and from his reign d) using power with care and responsibility towards those with less power, know that Hindus think these are important guidelines for right-living. (AMV Unit 3,6,8,9,10)
  • Understand when Hindus light lamps to celebrate Divali they remember that God guides us in life the way lamps light up darkness, to help us see our way. (AMV Units 6, 7, 8, 10)
  • Know Dharma means ‘right-living’ and that the Hindu faith is called the ‘Hindu Dharma’.

Belief – Deity (Brahman, Deva, Devi, Avatar)

  • Know that Hindu holy books describe Rama AND Krishna as special people called Avatars. These are believed by Hindus to be God, in human form and that God can choose to be born as an Avatar, in any time and place, when the world needs God’s help or example. (AMV Unit 3, 6, 9)
  • Know Hindus aim to visit places where the Avatars lived, e.g. Ayodhya & Vrindavan (AMV Unit 5,9, 10)
  • Know that Hindus believe that they can also worship God in other divine forms (or deities) alongside the Avatars, such as a loving mother (Devi), Lakshmi, popularly worshipped at Divali (AMV Unit 7, 10)

Belief – Atman (The Divine within)

  • Recognise a form of Hindu worship (called puja) using a special tray called ‘a puja thali’ with a small sacred flame, a bell, flower petals, incense and water to help them not be distracted by anything else they may see, hear, smell or touch around them, to make it a special time (AMV Unit 2)
  • Know that Hindus have a special place at home for performing puja once a day. (AMV Unit 6, 7)
  • Understand that Puja helps Hindus be quiet enough to ‘hear’ God guiding them from within and to know Hindus can perform Puja at home or in a place of worship called a Mandir (AMV Unit 7, 10)
  • Raise and suggest answers to relevant questions in response to the Hindu belief in Dharma, deity and Atman.
  • Attempt to support their answers using reasons and/or information.

Humanism

By the end of this phase of Key Stage 2

  • Be familiar with the concepts ‘material world’ and ‘secular’. Know that ‘secular’ means ‘concerned with the material world’ and ‘not concerned with religion’.
  • Be able to tell another person what is meant by ‘Humanist’ and ‘atheist’.
  • Be familiar with the story of the design of the ‘happy human’ logo.
  • Have had the opportunity to talk with members of a Humanist family.
  • Know that Humanists look for truth as it is known and accessible through science, reason and the experience of human beings of the ever-changing material world.
  • Know that Humanists primarily make decisions about right and wrong based on what is perceived to bring justice, happiness and peace to individuals, communities and societies. They should know that Humanists do not believe that knowledge of right and wrong comes from a deity or deities or that good deeds or wrong-doing will be judged and/or punished by a god or gods.

By the end of upper Key stage 2

Christianity

Key belief – Salvation

  • Identify the use of the word ‘atonement’ in Christianity as referring to the forgiving or pardoning of sin through the death and resurrection of Jesus.
  • Know that ‘atonement’ originally meant “at-one-ment”, which means being “at one” or harmony, with someone.
  • Know that Christians emphasize that Jesus is the Saviour of the world and through his death the sins of humanity have been forgiven.
  • Christians use a range of theories and metaphors to explain how this reconciliation works. A common approach in Western Christianity is that:
    – Humans have not lived in the way God intended – they have sinned
    – Having broken God’s Law, humans should have been punished. (Romans 6:23
    – Jesus is without sin
    – He sacrifices himself in the place of humanity
    – Because Jesus is without sin, he ‘pays the price’ which should have been paid by humanity’. (Galatians 3.13)
  • Reflect on and appraise the view that Easter celebrates Jesus dying to take the punishment (atonement)/ pay the debt of sin (redemption) so that people can be forgiven by God and live in relationship with Him.
  • Know that Christians believe that Jesus rose again and that faith in him will give eternal life to the believer (AMV units 2, 4,7,8).

Belief – God

  • Christians believe that “God is love” (1 John 4.8) – compassionate, all knowing (omniscient), everywhere at once (omnipresent), all powerful (almighty), pure, set apart (holy). (AMV units 2,3,4,7)
  • Christians believe that it matters what people do. When people treat others badly (sin) it makes God upset and angry.
  • Christians believe the Bible talks about what God is like and his relationship with people who believed in Him. (AMV units 3 & 4)
  • Raise and suggest answers to relevant questions in response to their enquiry into what Christians believe about God.
  • Recognize that Christians use evidence to support their belief in God. (AMV units 4,8)
  • Understand God loves His creation and everything is created in harmony.
  • Humans have a duty to care for God’s creation. They are the stewards of creation.
  • Raise and suggest answers to relevant questions in response to their enquiry into the evidence Christians use to support their belief in God and the concept of stewardship.

Belief – Incarnation

  • Know that the nativity is found in two gospels: Matthew (ch 1-2) and Luke (ch 1-2)
  • Understand that the two accounts are told from different viewpoints (Mary and Joseph’s)
  • Understand that for some Christians the virgin birth symbolizes that Jesus is both human and divine; though many Christians understand it literally.
  • Reflect on why there may be different accounts.
  • The nativity of Jesus concerns the Incarnation of Jesus: literally “become flesh”. Incarnation is the belief that Jesus Christ is fully human and fully God.
  • Identify how the belief that Jesus is “God is with us” helps a Christian in daily life. Christians pray because they believe that Jesus is with them to listen and to help. (AMV units 2,4 & 8)

Belief – Agape (selfless, sacrificial, unconditional love) (*Gospel) 

  • Recall what Jesus said about selfless, unconditional love in the Beatitudes (part of the Sermon on the Mount, Matthew 5.1-12 & 43-46).
  • Give examples of what Christians are doing today to live out these beliefs. (AMV units 2,4,6,8)
  • Jesus told his followers, “As I have loved you, so you must love one another.” John 13.35. Give examples of the ways that the Christian Church shows the love of God both to its members and across society, in the UK and wider world today. E.g. visiting the sick, chaplains, hospices, food banks, rehabilitation of prisoners and addicts, helping the homeless, street pastors, promoting fair trade, aid work, education and working with youth.
  • Raise and suggest answers to relevant questions in response to their enquiry into how Christians put the commandment to love into practice. How do these things set an example and cut across expectations?

Judaism

Key belief: G-d and the Covenant

  • Know that Jews have coming of age ceremonies: Bar and Bat Mitzvah (for boys and girls, respectively). These are important because it marks the time when people become responsible for following the Torah.
  • Know that Abraham is called one of the fathers of Judaism
  • Know the story of Abraham who Jews believe was the first person to believe in one G-d:
    • Abraham was rich and lived in Ur; the people worshipped many gods
    • G-d speaks to Abraham and tells him to leave his home with 3 promises: a relationship with G-d, numerous descendants and land
    • but Sara is barren
    • with no scriptures or traditions, he puts his faith in G-d
  • Understand that, for Jews, the covenant that began with Abraham is an important belief of a two-way relationship. Jews put their faith in G-d (not blind faith – Abraham often questions G-d) and G-d gives his blessings to Abraham and his descendants.
  • Know that Yom Kippur is the holiest day in the Jewish calendar.
    • This period starts with Rosh Hashannah and ends ten days later with Yom Kippur.  It is during this time of fasting that Jews show how sorry they are, and attend the synagogue as often as they can, listening to the Torah; for asking for forgiveness from those who they have wronged, forgive those who have wronged them and ask G-d to forgive them; saying, “And for all these, God of forgiveness, forgive us, pardon us, and grant us atonement”.
  • Understand how Jews celebrate the Shabbat and why it is considered the most important festival:
    • Timing of Shabbat, no work, but study, rest and leisure
    • Time to celebrate belief in one G-d as creator
    • Central rituals: Kiddush, lighting candles, wine shared and bread cut
    • Attendance at Synagogue and opening of Ark
    • Dietary rules including kosher and trefah and separation of meat and milk.
  • Raise and suggest answers to relevant questions in response to the concept of a covenant with G-d.
  • Attempt to support their answers using reasons and/or information.


Belief: Torah

  • Recall that Jewish scriptures are called the Tenakh, which are made up of 3 sections: Torah, Nevi’ism and Ketuvim. The word Tenakh, is made up of these 3 types of writing.
  • Know that the Torah is the most important because it tells Jews what God is like and how they should live.
  • Know that the teachings in the Torah are summed up in the Shema, which is kept on the doorpost of Jewish homes. It says “Hear O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one …”
  • Understand that there is also a collection of writings called the Talmud. These contain the teaching of rabbis over many years. It gives more details about how to put the rules found in the Torah into practice.
  • Understand the meaning of Simchat Torah: a ceremony at the end of Sukkot, when the final part of Deuteronomy and the first part of Genesis is read to show that the reading of the Torah never stops. It reminds Jews that it is important to study and obey the Law throughout their lives.
  • Raise and suggest answers to relevant questions in response to the the idea of being able to put into practice the teachings of the Torah.
  • Attempt to support their answers using reasons and/or information

Islam

Key belief – Islam (Submission to the will of Allah)

  • Know that Islam means “Submission (to the will of Allah)” and the word Muslims means someone who has willingly submitted themselves to Allah.
  • Know that God’s message is known as the ‘Straight Path’ or the Shariah
  • Know that the Shari’a is taken from the Qur’an and the Sunnah (sayings and doings of the Prophet Muhammad recorded in the Hadith).
  • Understand that the Qur’an is the original and most basic source of God’s Law, but Sunna provide Muslims with the practical interpretations of how to apply the Qur’an to everyday life. Muslims believe Muhammad received instructions from Gabriel and so these are as valid as those in the Qur’an.
  • Know that humans have the role of Khalifah, trustees of Allah’s creation. All things belong to Allah. Muslims have always studied nature for signs and wonders of Allah
  • Understand that the practices of Zakat (giving) and Saum (fasting during Ramadan) illustrate the concept of Khalifah:
    • Zakat (giving) is a duty (something you must do) not charity (something you might chose to do); it should be done anonymously, receiving no praise.
    • Saum (fasting during Ramadan) is an act of learning to appreciate all that God has provided.
  • Know the story of Bilal and understand why this story is important to Muslims:
    • Bilal is a black African slave; refuses to obey his master to attack one of Muhammad’s followers who claimed that all people are equal; while imprisoned, waiting to be punished, he became a Muslim; close to death he was sold to Abu Bakr one of Muhammad’s closest companions; Bilal was freed; Bilal became the first Muezzin (gave the first call to prayer at the first mosque in Medina and then at the Ka’aba).
    • Meaning:
      • this story emphasises that people should be judged not by their position in society or race, but on their commitment to obey Allah’s commands.
      • That Allah alone is worthy of worship.
      • Bilal exemplified his dedication to Allah, even risking his own life. He is a role model to Muslims.
  • Raise and suggest answers to relevant questions in response to what they have learnt about the Islamic belief in submitting to the will of Allah.
  • Attempt to support their answers using reasons and/or information  

 

Belief – Iman (faith) Messengers of Allah

  • Know the Muslim belief that Muhammad is the final Prophet.
  • Know the names of Prophets that lived before Muhammad who are named in the Qur’an, including: Adam, Abraham, Moses and Jesus. According to the Qur’an these prophets taught essentially the same religion (din) (from Adam to Muhammad). know that all the Prophets before Muhammad were given the same message. Muslims do not criticise the prophets of other religions, because of this. Muslims show great respect to these by adding the phrase, ‘peace be upon them’. They also show great respect to the sacred texts of other religions; such as gospels and Torah.
  • Know the Muslim belief that humans have a tendency to forget, ignore or tamper with, God’s clear message.
  • Understand that the Muslims believe the Qur’an is (a) the word of God not a human creation, (b) is the authentic version of the revelations to Muhammad in word, rhythm (it is poetic) and so must be read in Arabic, (c) the most comprehensive and final book of knowledge and instruction to believers.
  • Know that Islam means “Submission (to the will of Allah)” and the word Muslims means someone who has willingly submitted themselves to Allah.
  • Understand the Muslim belief that humans have not followed God’s message in the past because of over self-confidence (hubris) and so they
    • forgot it
    • ignore it
    • tamper with it

Hinduism

Key Belief – Dharma. (Right-living, respecting life, honouring Natural world)

  • Know that the term “Hinduism” is a Western term for people who lived in Northern India, who shared the Vedas and ancient Sanskrit writings of India. Followers prefer the term “Sanatan Dharma”, which mean ‘eternal truths’ (i.e. basic teachings which have always been true and always will be).
  • Know the Holi festival celebrates Spring, community and equality, reminding Hindus to respect the natural world and its seasons (AMV Unit 7, 10) Also recall the Holika story, who died using her powers to try and kill Prahlad, a believer in God, and understand how this reminds Hindus to use their gifts to help not hurt others, the principle of ahimsa (AMV Unit 6,9,10)
  • Know the Hindu word for acting from personal preference, without attention to Dharma is called Karma and it always impacts on ourselves and others, known as the Law of Karma (AMV Unit 6,8)

Belief – Deity (Brahman, Deva, Devi, Avatar)

  • Understand that thousands of years ago, Hindu books called the Vedas described many ways of thinking about God with special names, images and stories to help Hindus remember and understand about God. Hindus pray to God by any of these names and ways. (AMV Unit 3, 10)
  • Recall the story of Shiva and the Ganges. Understand that Hindus believe that whilst the natural world is all from within God and so is to be treated as special, the Ganges is a holy river to visit and Shiva is a special and particularly powerful form of God to worship. (AMV 3,5,7,10)
  • Hinduism teaches that there is one Supreme Being/Person, Brahman. Brahman is everywhere and everything that exists lives in Brahman all the time. Nothing would exist if Brahman was not in it.
  • Recognise the symbol often associated with Hinduism: Aum. The sound is sacred and is a way of describing Brahman.

 

Belief – Atman (The Divine within)

  • Recall the Hindu greeting Namaste and its meaning: ‘I respect you’, because Hindus believe the same God is inside every heart and must be treated as one world-family (AMV Unit 7, 8, 10)
  • Hindus believe in Reincarnation: the belief that when a body dies their atman (“soul”) may move onto another being. In the Bhagavad Gita this is likened to someone changing dirty clothes for clean ones. Similarly, the Atman casts off its worn out body for a new one. (Bhagavad Gita 2:22).
  • The Atman persists and is reborn many times. This continual cycle is called Samsara.
  • The type of life an Atman moves onto depends on its previous one. This is determined by the   Law of Karma.
  • The end of Samsara is called Moksha. The soul breaks out of reincarnation and joins with Brahman.
  • Raise and suggest answers to relevant questions in response to the Hindu belief in Dharma, deity and Atman.
  • Attempt to support their answers using reasons and/or information.

Humanism

By the end of upper Key Stage 2

Be able to say what the ‘happy human’ logo tells us about the Humanist perspective.

  • Be familiar with the term ‘agnostic’ and its two related meanings – 1) a person who holds that nothing is known or can be known about anything beyond the material world and 2) a person who does not know whether a god, gods or anything beyond the material world exists. They should know that some Humanists are agnostic.
  • Be able to say why Humanism is a life stance but not a religion.
  • Know how secular Humanists regard life and death. They should know that the focus of their attention is on what can be achieved during this life in this world and that they hold that death is the end of life.
  • Know how Humanists might celebrate marriage or conduct an event to mark the death of someone close to them. Be able to say how these differ from a religious ceremony and why.
  • Be able to name two prominent Humanist scientists of the modern period and say something about their lives and contribution to our understanding of the world, e.g. Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, Helen Caldicott.
  • Know that the Humanist perspective informs music, song, poetry, literature and the visual arts and be able to refer to at least one example, e.g. John Lennon’s Imagine.
  • Be aware of the work of the British Humanist Association (BHA) in promoting understanding of Humanism.